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In what ways are expository essays similar to business communication?

What Is Expository Writing?

❶You can repeat this exercise many times to continue to refine and develop your ideas.

What is an Expository Essay?

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This topic would be an explaining essay that would give the details of how this would happen. If your assignment is to make an argumentative essay, then you could ask the question, "What is the best procedure for having elementary students go to lunch? Writing Jobs for Stay at Home Moms: How to Get Cheap Life Insurance: How to Find Lego Assembly Instructions: The process of expository writing is the same as writing an argument essay.

However, don't be confused by the word "argument" because, in this context, it doesn't mean you are trying to "argue" your point with someone. What it means is that you are trying to explain your point of view about a claim, which can be a statement of:. How to write an argument essay: How to write an explaining essay: How to write cause and effect: How to write problem solution: Will this topic work for an expository essay: Why is it required? How to be so? What happens when you below the mark?

Usually, it is best to have a single question as the basis of your expository. It can be an explaining question, "What is integrity? One thing you need to know is that "expository" is really another name for a persuasive or argumentative essay. So you can look at any of my articles which explain how to write argument or position essays. Additionally,I have a number of articles explaining the steps in writing and the best one to start with is "How to Write a Great Thesis Sentence" http: After you have a thesis, you will need to fill out an outline, so you might want to see how to do that in "Writing Good Topic Sentences" http: Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites. This will help me so much today, thank you for putting up this site. It's very easy to read as well Thank you so much. This is very useful and educational! Absolutely love how thorough this hub was and very easy to read since it was organized very well.

Thank you so much for writing this. This is such a thorough piece about writing essays, and I will definitely be referring to it now and then when I write. I especially appreciate your pre-writing worksheet. These are some great ideas. Writing a paper in college always seems to freeze people up and they never know what to write. Even when you like writing, you just draw a blank. Thanks for the info! Half a million views - wow! I'm not surprised that students find your articles helpful. You've tapped into a very receptive and never diminishing market.

Thanks Crystal--My writing articles all began as handouts I gave to my own students. I started posting them here on HubPages so that my students who had finished my course still had access to them. Quite to my surprise, I've found they have been used by students all over the world. I have about half a million views of my articles so far after just a couple of years. I'd always wanted to write a book, but now I think that online writing is more fun! Wow what a great list! I hope you have found some appropriate sites to market this hub toward said students.

Voted up and useful. A very useful list. I'm keeping this one and will refer to it when I need inspiration. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. HubPages and Hubbers authors may earn revenue on this page based on affiliate relationships and advertisements with partners including Amazon, Google, and others.

To provide a better website experience, owlcation. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so. For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: Expository Essay Definition Explain something or answer questions like: How should we define it?

How do you do it? How does it work? What is the history of it? What are the effects? What is the meaning of it? How can I do it well? What caused it to happen? Why should it matter? Follow these three easy steps: Choose a great topic: Scan the list of topics below, or pick something you either know a lot about or would like to learn about. Writing is always easier if you are interested in the topic.

It may take 30 minutes or more if you do research , but when you are done you should be ready to write. Use your computer's spell and grammar check program, and use Grammarly, which is a free check for errors. Have at least one other person read your paper and give you advice. Finally, read your paper out loud so that you slow down as you read and notice your errors.

College Experience Paper Ideas One of the easiest topics is to write something that explains a person, place, event or organization at your University. Interview other students, staff, or faculty.

You can use their quotes or stories as evidence for your paper. Observe the place you are writing about. Sit down with a notepad or your phone and write down your sensory experiences what you smell, hear, see, taste, and touch. You can even listen to conversations and observe people. Vividly-written details and personal experience make your expository paper stand out. Research by looking at past issues of your college paper or on the college website. You might also find information posted on buildings around campus, the library, or in pamphlets at the visitor's center.

What is the history of your college? Who are the students at your college? What is the background of most students? How are students different? What do they have in common? Pick a professor at your college to interview. What is their background and how did they get interested in their subject? What is the history of your college mascot? Describe in detail a statue or memorial marker on campus. Research the history of the marker and the person or event it commemorates.

How does one join a sorority or fraternity? How can you stay healthy while dining on campus food? What's the best way to choose which college activities to be involved in as a freshman? How has your college has changed over the years? What do you need to do to get ready for a college football game or other sport at your school?

Why should people attend games of a less popular sport? Pick one you like. What's the worst way to study for finals? How can a student survive the first few weeks of college? How can you be a great roommate? What are ways to use the local coffee house to avoid studying? What causes college freshmen to be depressed?

How can you help a suicidal friend? What do you have to do to win a campus election? What should you leave at home when you go to college? How best to decide which college to go to? How to get scholarships for college.

How can one pay for college without getting into too much debt? What are the best scandals or memorable events in your college's history? Pick a building on your campus: Describe its history and describe how the building got its name especially if it is named after someone. How can a person best separate from their parents in college? How can someone avoid dating the wrong people in college? How long does your expository paper need to be? Social Problem Essay Topics What happens to juveniles who break the law?

What causes people to be homeless? What is the Salvation Army? How do they help the needy? Or choose another non-profit charity that helps the poor. What are the effects on a family when a parent becomes a meth addict? What causes teenagers to run away? How does having a single parent affect children in the areas of education, hygiene, and nutrition? How do people without health insurance get medical treatment? Keep in mind that your introduction should identify the main idea of your expository essay and act as a preview to your essay.

You could start with an anecdote, an informative and attention-grabbing quote, a bold opinion statement, or anything that will make your readers want to continue with your essay.

Provide enough background information or context to guide your readers through your essay. Think about what your readers will need to know to understand the rest of your essay. Provide this information in your first paragraph. If you are writing about a specific day in history, summarize the day's events.

Then, explain how it fits into a broader historical scope. If you are writing about a person, name the person and provide a brief biography. Keep in mind that your context should lead up to your thesis statement. Explain everything your reader needs to know to understand what your topic is about. Then narrow it down until you reach the topic itself. Provide your thesis statement. Your thesis statement should be sentences that express your main argument.

If your essay is purely informative, it should address your methods for presenting your information to your readers. Determine how many paragraphs to include. The most common length for an expository essay is five-paragraphs, but an expository essay can be longer than that.

Refer to your assignment guidelines or ask your instructor if you are unsure about the required length of your paper. A five-paragraph essay should include three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis.

Each paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence. Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence. The topic sentence introduces the main idea of the paragraph. It should introduce one piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis. If you're working with a specific text, you may start with a direct quote or a properly cited paraphrase of the argument you're referencing.

For example, if you are writing an expository essay about the use of dogs in the US Marine Corps during WWII, your main ideas and topic sentences could be something like: Elaborate on your supporting evidence.

After you have stated your topic sentence, provide specific evidence from your research to support it. Offer a new piece of evidence for every body paragraph in your essay.

Your evidence could also come from interviews, anecdotes, or personal experience. Try to provide at least two to three pieces of evidence to support each of your claims.

For example, if a paragraph starts with, "War dogs were even eligible to receive military awards for their service," the supporting evidence might be a list of dogs who got awards and the awards they were given. Analyze the significance of each piece of evidence. Explain how the evidence you have provided in that paragraph connects to your thesis. Write a sentence or two for each piece of evidence. Consider what your readers will need to know as you explain these connections.

Conclude and transition into your next paragraph. Each paragraph should transition into the next. The conclusion of each body paragraph should sum up your main point while showing how it works with your next point. You could write, "Even though Dobermans were the most common breed used in WWII, they were not the only breed, and were not the only dogs recognized for their help.

Restate and rephrase your thesis. The first sentence of your concluding paragraph should restate your thesis. But you should not just restate your thesis. You should also say what the evidence you have provided has added to your thesis.

It just says it in a new way while also hinting at the information you included in the body of the essay. Summarize and review your main ideas. Take one sentence to summarize each main piece of supporting evidence, as presented in your essay's body.

Once the thesis works, the rest of the essay falls into place more easily. While your essay should be clear and concise, it can also be lively and engaging.

Having a friend read the essay helps writers edit with a fresh perspective. The important thing is to learn from the experience and use the feedback to make the next essay better. Essay writing is a huge part of a education today.

Most students must learn to write various kinds of essays during their academic careers, including different types of expository writing:. Time4Writing essay writing courses offer a highly effective way to learn how to write the types of essays required for school, standardized tests, and college applications. A unique online writing program for elementary, middle school, and high school students, Time4Writing breaks down the writing process into manageable chunks, easily digested by young writers.

Students steadily build writing skills and confidence, guided by one-on-one instruction with a dedicated, certified teacher.

Our middle school Welcome to the Essay and Advanced Essay courses teach students the fundamentals of writing essays, including the expository essay.

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What Is Expository Writing? The purpose of the expository essay is to explain a topic in a logical and straightforward manner. Without bells and whistles, these essays present a fair and balanced analysis of a subject based on facts—with no references to the writer’s opinions or emotions.

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Expository Essay Samples When writing an expository essay, you need to show the deeper side of your chosen subject. Check out our expository essay samples to better understand the process of writing one yourself.

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Knowing how to write an expository essay is a valuable skill, and you’ll write lots of them in college. It’s easy, but if you need some essay writing help - you can always rely on our service. An expository essay usually builds on the simple 5-paragraph-essay structure. An expository essay is an essay that requires to examine a specific topic and give arguments. It involves a presentation of the main thought in a clear manner using the contrast and comparison and including the relevant examples and explanations of certain phenomena.

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Oct 02,  · Expository Essay Topic Ideas, Writing Tips, and Sample Essays. Updated on May 15, Virginia Kearney. more. Virginia has been a university English instructor for over 20 years. She specializes in helping people write essays faster and easier. Expository Essay artspot.cfs: Expository essays discuss topics by using facts rather than opinions, requiring students to evaluate and investigate while setting forth their arguments clearly and concisely. Teachers often include expository essays as part of assessments, especially in college-level courses, so students can help.